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Thread: Rigging ground tackle on E30+

  1. #1
    Principal Partner mherrcat's Avatar
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    Rigging ground tackle on E30+

    I am trying to figure out how to secure my anchor rode to the boat when anchoring. I have only been day-sailing but want to start practicing the anchoring procedure.

    I have a bow roller, but it is offset to starboard and there is no cleat directly behind it to give a fair lead over the roller. If I go over the roller and attach directly to either cleat on the rail, the rode will ride across the base of the pulpit stanchions. I am afraid of the strain that could put on them.

    I thought about trying to rig a line with a snatch block from one of the cleats and lead the rode through that, but there is very little room to get a line with a block in there; the splice in the line ends up right on the cleat making it difficult to tie off.

    I have attached a pic of the bow roller and some drawings. In the drawings the red line is the anchor rode and the green line would be the line with the snatch block.

    Or should I just forget going over the bow roller and tie the rode off to either of the bow cleats. How would you do this?
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    Last edited by mherrcat; 07-01-2009 at 05:19 PM.
    Mark H.
    1985 Ericson 30+

  2. #2
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    E34 - same problem

    Your pic 2 also describes the situation on my E34. I have a piece of hose-type chafing gear (heavy rubber) that I slip over the rode at the contact point with the pulpit base. My thinking was that the angle of deflection is very small, and the lateral force on the pulpit base that low down is well within acceptable limits. Someone leaning against the pulpit high up or (help me!) holding the boat at the top of a stanchion puts way more strain on the bases and the seals. Having rebedded my anchor well and bow cleats two years ago, I can tell you that the backing plates are all solid and sturdy.

    BTW, I also slide a similar piece of chafing gear over the rode where it runs through the bow roller.
    Chris Winter
    E34 Dangriga 1988 #267

  3. #3
    Contributing Partner tilwinter's Avatar
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    why the snatch block

    Could you not (knot?) accomplish the same thing using a second line tied to the main rode with a rolling hitch, Prusik, or Klemheist knot?
    Rod Johnson
    Formerly Ericson 30+ 1981
    "Til Winter"

  4. #4
    Seglare Sven's Avatar
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    I would suggest not leaving the load on the roller, no matter how you tie it off.



    -Sven
    Senta II
    1977 Ericson 39-B -- Hull # 216
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  5. #5
    Principal Partner mherrcat's Avatar
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    Since I haven't yet used the anchor, maybe I'm not understanding this correctly.

    Are you saying I should just drop the anchor over the side and tie off to one of the two bow cleats? Then what is the purpose of having the bow roller?

    I was also under the impression that leading the rode directly off the bow was preferrable, in terms of boat motion at anchor, to leading it off the side.
    Mark H.
    1985 Ericson 30+

  6. #6
    1984 Ericson 30+, Nanaimo, BC
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    Mark,

    I also have an E30+ and do lots of anchoring. My bow roller is a bit more central than yours appears from your drawing, so I don't have quite the issue you do with where to lead the rode to get it more fair. However, I do run the anchor rode over the bow roller and then tie it off on the starboard cleat. I also then run it across to the port cleat and tie it off there as well, as a back-up (probably an unnecessary precaution, but it only takes a minute).

    I would not run the rode over the side, as I think it may chafe on the rub rail and affect the swinging of the boat at anchor.

    I don't understand Sven's concern about leaving it on the bow roller, as most times there's not that much pressure on the anchor rode when I'm anchored in sheltered areas, and that's what they are designed for anyway.

    Frank

  7. #7
    Principal Partner mherrcat's Avatar
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    Forgot that I had taken these pictures last weekend. This is a better view of the orientation of the bow roller:
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    Mark H.
    1985 Ericson 30+

  8. #8
    Principal Partner u079721's Avatar
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    Here is my solution

    Here is my "quick and easy" solution, which I wrote up and had published in Good Old Boat and Practical Boat Owner magazines. This is actually quite a common problem, as most boats do not have a centerline cleat to use when tying off the rode.

    Basically I used a length of line (~ 1/2", 8' or so) and a rolling hitch to keep the line away from the bow pulpit. Surprisingly I've never seen anyone else do this, as most folks with this type of set up seem content with having the rode chafe on the bow pulpit supports. It worked great, and I never once had it come loose, even during a storm.
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    Last edited by u079721; 07-07-2009 at 01:26 PM.
    Steve Christensen
    Twin Cities, MN
    Former Owner of Rag Doll
    1989 Ericson 38-200
    Hull Number: ERY38318C989
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  9. #9
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    I agree with Sven. No reason to go over the anchor roller if you don't have to. I anchor my E38 from either cleat, just one of them, and it works fine. I have used the bow roller and fancy knots, extra line, etc. to get the load centered between the cleats but never noticed any difference in the way the boat moves at anchor compared to just hanging from one cleat. The rub rail on my boat is very smooth, as is the stainless stem reinforcement at the bow. I have never seen any chafe on my anchor rode or the mooring lines which see WAY more use than any anchor rode. IMHO, the anchor roller is there to help you retrieve the rode and store the anchor, thats it. I do use both cleats, run the rode to one cleat, then across to the second for extra security. RT
    Rob Thomas
    Wakefield, RI
    1983 Ericson E38 "Ruby"
    "I purchased a boat because setting fire to $100 bills was not an efficient enough way to dispose of them...."

  10. #10
    Principal Partner u079721's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwthomas1 View Post
    I agree with Sven. No reason to go over the anchor roller if you don't have to. I anchor my E38 from either cleat, just one of them, and it works fine. I have used the bow roller and fancy knots, extra line, etc. to get the load centered between the cleats but never noticed any difference in the way the boat moves at anchor compared to just hanging from one cleat. The rub rail on my boat is very smooth, as is the stainless stem reinforcement at the bow. I have never seen any chafe on my anchor rode or the mooring lines which see WAY more use than any anchor rode. IMHO, the anchor roller is there to help you retrieve the rode and store the anchor, thats it. I do use both cleats, run the rode to one cleat, then across to the second for extra security. RT

    This was my first solution to the issue, but I was always concerned with the line chafing on the front of the boat when the bow would be blown off temporarily to one side. Again this may not be a problem, but when that happens the lead is not fair, and chafe can happen. The only way I could see to totally avoid chafe was to use the anchor roller with a second line as I show above.
    Last edited by u079721; 07-07-2009 at 01:32 PM.
    Steve Christensen
    Twin Cities, MN
    Former Owner of Rag Doll
    1989 Ericson 38-200
    Hull Number: ERY38318C989
    Universal M40

  11. #11
    Principal Partner mherrcat's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the info. I guess I can try both methods and see which works best for my boat.

    I just didn't like the idea of running the rode across the base of the stanchions; seems like just asking for trouble.
    Mark H.
    1985 Ericson 30+

  12. #12
    Principal Partner bayhoss's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    My E28 has the same cleat/bow roller config. as your boat. I make fast to one cleat (first cleat). Then take the remaining stowed line, go the bottom of the opposite cleat(second cleat) and then to the anchor line (looping under) just before the bow roller, then come over pulling it straight. Then secure to the second cleat. A very secure stance for a storm.
    Hope this helps!
    Frank
    E28, Valinor

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