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Thread: E30+ Halyard change

  1. #1
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    E30+ Halyard change

    I have a 1985 E30+ with a wire to rope halyard that needs replacing. I would like to replace with an all rope version, but am unsure if I would also need to re-size the sheave on the original masthead. Read a similar question/response about an E27, but the rig is substantially different.

    Any comments appreciated!

  2. #2
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    halyard relacement

    I replaced the wire/rope halyards on my 1980 30+ w/Sta-Set X. Vast inprovement over old halyards. Carefully check the sheaves (pulleys) in the masthead to check for excessive wear or sharp edges that might cut the new halyards. You can get replacement sheaves from RigRite, Schaefer, Harken, and others. Just measure width, O.D., & axle dia. (3/8" I believe) and they can provide the proper one. The axles slide out when you remove the retainer plates on the outside of the spar. I used 3/8 diameter Sta-Set X. It's strong enough that you can go from the 7/16 original w/no problems. Don't ues regular dacron double braid though. It's too streachy. You need to use one of the hi-tech lines like the Sta-Set X that are made to be used for halyards.
    Have fun & sail fast
    Bud E34 "Escapade"

  3. #3
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    Bud,

    Thanks for the info - followed your advice (used 3/8 Sta-set X) and what an amazing difference!

    Ken E
    "En Route"

  4. #4
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    Question wire to rope question

    It's interesting to watch the wire to rope discussion that crops up from time to time here. We are in the process of getting new sails, and may repace the halyard. Around here if you suggest the idea if going all rope, the general reaction is a blank stare...yet on this site oft times contribitors are shocked that anyone would even THINK of using wire anymore.
    Why the different reactions? Is it a regional thing, or a a "newbie" vs "old-timer " thing?

  5. #5
    Contributing Partner WhiteNoise's Avatar
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    Much of the change is really a matter of technology. Years ago the technology in line did not offer the low stretch options we have today hence rope and wire. Wire does not stretch and rope with go around a winch drum and be easy on the hands.

    Now with the improved low stretch line we can have the best of both worlds and less weight aloft.

    There are other reasons but I think that these would be considered the primary ones.

    I'm sure there are also some who would say that rope/wire is better for reasons of durability which could be a valid point also. Again though, with new technology in line coverings, that gap has been bridged also.

    In the case of whether or not to replace, I would replace with all rope but (if you are cruising) only replace if needed. If your rope/wire halyards are in good shape I see so major reason to change.

    Just my thoughts.

    Hope that helps and happy sailing!

    -Chris
    Chris

    "Nodding the head does not row the boat"
    -Irish Proverb

    1984 Ericson 30+
    Pegasus

  6. #6
    Senior Moderator Loren Beach's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Chip View Post
    It's interesting to watch the wire to rope discussion that crops up from time to time here. We are in the process of getting new sails, and may repace the halyard. Around here if you suggest the idea if going all rope, the general reaction is a blank stare...yet on this site oft times contribitors are shocked that anyone would even THINK of using wire anymore.
    Why the different reactions? Is it a regional thing, or a a "newbie" vs "old-timer " thing?
    One reason I can think of for the "blank stare" is that a large percentage of boat owners never upgrade any running rigging until it completely fails. That could easily be 30 years or if their boats get light usage it will never happen during their own term of ownership. It is kind of like the discussion about when to replace a sail. It the present sail is mostly white and still attached at three corners it is deemed to be just fine for sailing. Since no one likes to spend money, in good times or during recessions, it is an easy rationalization to make.

    Halyard technology moved forward decades ago. You already know why wire halyards exist, and absent having wire reel winches on the spar, boats have a spliced-in rope tail to enable handling, winching, and cleating.
    The now-a-generation-old low stretch line replacements eliminate the wire and the splice.
    One thing about replacing with wire, though, is that on older boats that sheave at the masthead may have been sized more for small-diameter wire, and staying with that technology obviates the need to replace or re-machine that sheave.

    Sidebar: When you get to reducing weight aloft as an argument you are starting to study the performance side of sailing, along with sail shape and more shaping controls that good sail adjustments can bring.

    I hear this discussion around the moorage fairly often -- kind of like a sort of mantra denying the existence of entrophy or improved technology. You have probably heard some of the liturgy -- "why replace old standing rigging when the mast has never fallen down?" and "why replace rusty lifelines when no one has broken them and gone overboard yet?" and "old baggy sails never need replacement as long as they have not ripped out."

    If I drove my 150K mile pickup truck around with bald tires, no muffler, and the engine firing on only 5 of its 6 cylinders, and refused to do any maintenance on it, it would not be viewed as a "newbie vs old-timer" situation...

    So -- do what you can, within the budget and priorities you have. Sail as much as possible. As they say in Lake Wobegone, Do good work and keep in touch!

    Cheers,
    Loren
    Last edited by Loren Beach; 04-15-2009 at 08:24 AM.
    1988 Olson 34 #8
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    Betamarine 25 (new 2018)
    Fresh Air
    Portland, OR USA

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