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Thread: [E32-3] How do you remove the head hoses on an E32?

  1. #1
    Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm Sati's Avatar
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    [E32-3] How do you remove the head hoses on an E32?

    Hi folks,

    Early year project is to replace all the head hoses and replace the PHII pump. My system currently runs from the head to the Y valve underneath the sink, and then out towards the hull, forward to the holding tank in the port V-berth. The deck fitting hose runs out from the holding tank, up to the deck fitting that looks to be behind a bulkhead or other wall. I can't make out how I would get to it for replacement - what's the usual process with this?

    For the Y-Valve -> Holding Tank hose, would I just undo it from the Y-Valve, gorilla tape the new hose, and push it through up and out of the V-Berth?
    For the Holding Tank -> Deck Fitting hose, how do I replace the hose at the Deck Fitting end?

    Any other weird bends or things behind walls/bulkheads I'm going to have to look out for?
    Geoff W.
    s/v "Delightful"
    1987 E32-3
    Hull #712

  2. #2
    Moderator Christian Williams's Avatar
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    When I did that years ago I removed the entire deck fitting and pulled the hose out, attached.

    New hose, new deck fitting attached, and snake it down the reverse of how it came out.
    Thelonious II, E381 hull 513 (1984) Universal 5432
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    kapnkd kapnkd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sati View Post
    Hi folks,

    Early year project is to replace all the head hoses and replace the PHII pump. My system currently runs from the head to the Y valve underneath the sink, and then out towards the hull, forward to the holding tank in the port V-berth. The deck fitting hose runs out from the holding tank, up to the deck fitting that looks to be behind a bulkhead or other wall. I can't make out how I would get to it for replacement - what's the usual process with this?

    For the Y-Valve -> Holding Tank hose, would I just undo it from the Y-Valve, gorilla tape the new hose, and push it through up and out of the V-Berth?
    For the Holding Tank -> Deck Fitting hose, how do I replace the hose at the Deck Fitting end?

    Any other weird bends or things behind walls/bulkheads I'm going to have to look out for?

    Head hoses are a special breed of “wild animal” with a mind of their own regardless of which model/size boat it is! Extreme patience, a serious sense of humor and perseverance are an absolute necessity in dealing with any and all work endeavors! Seems the “ID” sizes of whatever you try to cobble up are difficult to match no matter what you attempt to do.

    Reading your postings, I sympathize now that I have (finally) finished mine. There really should be some sort of merit badge for all of this we endured and hopefully survived ��
    (Most certainly I came up with more “four letter sailor words” than for any other project I’ve ever had!) ��
    Last edited by kapnkd; 01-11-2019 at 03:20 PM.

  4. #4
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    Removing head components

    The short answer is with a Multimax. https://www.dremel.com/en_US/product...multi-max-mm30

    The longer answer is that to replace the drain line would require pulling the holding tank to get to the lower fitting, and you do NOT want to open that in the boat!

    My new to me 32-3 came with the classic aroma of eu-de-toilette mixed with anti-freeze, but the head and cabinet area were clean. Peeking past the holding tank, it was clear there had been some amount of leakage in the compartment beneath the v-berth. I decided to remove the whole system and go to a composting toilet so here's how I just did it.

    All of the head-related hoses were hardened, including the big head hoses. The lower one is impossible to get to with the tank installed. Even if the hoses could be removed from the fittings, they were too hard to allow enough flex to pull through and out. Strategically, now that it is January and near freezing is the absolute best time to remove the system because the smell and humidity are far less than when summer comes.


    The boat is on stands and nothing available to pump the tank contents, so I drained the little which would come out. To remove the holding tank requires removal of the large white panel under the V berth and removal of the two braces at the ends of the screwdriver. I tried to just remove the braces and cut the hoses, but the bottom of the tank won't allow it to rotate up through the hole.

    Since I plan to use the area of the holding tank as a storage locker, the panel only took a single cut to remove the portion of the panel which covers the holding tank, plus removing the screws along the outboard edge, and cutting the silicone sealer along the panel edges. (See last photo) At that point, there are still screws which come upward from a support that is attached to the bulkhead which is the head wall. I am replacing the panel anyway, so pulled up on the forward edge, pulling the screws out of the panel. I don't think you could get down there with a screwdriver to save the panel.

    Once the panel is out and the hoses are cut, you are just dead lifting the tank and a few gallons of remnants which is not too hard. Those big hoses are a steel wire spiral wrapped construction, so the MultiMax was used till cutting the wires with a pair of dykes. As you can see, it was the lower fitting on mine which was leaking, so the tank had to come out anyway.


    Under the head sink, the MultiMax is also the fastest way to get the hardened overboard hose off of the Y valve, leaving enough length to grab to get the remaining hose off the shut-off.

    Final observation:
    Without the tank, it was good to see the tabbing of the bulkhead was in good shape. However, I'm still trying to understand flow beneath the sub-floor grid of this boat. From here, the flow has to get to the bilge, but the grid beneath the head is in the way. My guess to this point is there is enough room under/around the grid to get to the bilge pump and keel bolts.

    Look at all the new-found storage space!


    Good luck with yours.
    Last edited by Tin Kicker; 01-26-2019 at 07:54 AM.

  5. #5
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    One tip from having done this on two different boats: diapers!

    My experience, and from others who have done this, is that there always "water" of some kind hiding somewhere in the hoses.

    Tape is fine but it isn't fool proof and surely not absorbent.

  6. #6
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    Agreed. btw -This was kinda "special" to find. The thru-hull handles were arranged so that one or the other could not be full shut if you wanted both to be closed!

    I can't imagine who would put this in and leave them.

  7. #7
    Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm Sati's Avatar
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    Tin Kicker, looking at the way your lower fitting comes up, it seems like it might be a huge PITA but not impossible to change the hose on the lower fitting? Mine isn't leaking, but that does seem like one of the more important hoses to get switched out. Even if I took the holding tank out to put the new hose on outside the boat, then I'd be trying to snake the new hose up through the walls and out the deck fitting rather than the other direction, which seems easier.

    I might have had an actual liveaboard slip open up for me in the next month or two so this project just jumped off the "keep talking about doing it" pile and into the "actually friggin do it" pile. I'll also be replacing the whole PHII pump assembly...mine is leaking and shitty (no pun intended) and has already been rebuilt 3 times, seems like I may as well just swap it out.
    Geoff W.
    s/v "Delightful"
    1987 E32-3
    Hull #712

  8. #8
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    Hi Geoff -

    If you mean that the hose could have been simply replaced if the seacock remained, yes, it could have been. I've become a believer in composting toilets and so the lower/bigger seacock and thru-hull will be removed and glassed over. The upper one is the drain for the sink and I plan to leave it.

    Congrats on the live aboard opportunity.

    Bob / TK

  9. #9
    Principal Partner Kenneth K's Avatar
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    On removing difficult hoses: just remembered this from when I took my starboard water tank out. If there's not enough room to get a good grip on the hose (to pull it off the barbed fitting) don't bother pulling it off the barb--just get a wrench on the threaded side of the fitting and remove the whole fitting with the hose still attached. The barbed end will just rotate around inside the hose once you loosen the hose clamps and break the seal. After the fittings is outof the tank, you can pull the hose and the fitting out together, take it somewhere where you have more room, and then work the barb out of the hose.

    Granted, it's a ittle messier with a waste hose than a water hose.....
    Ken
    '85 E32-3 "Mariah" #641
    Universal M-25

    "Saltwater is the cure; sweat, tears, or the sea......"

  10. #10
    Junior Member BillyT's Avatar
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    An obvious tip with all hose removals/replacements is to heat them up with a heat gun to soften them up. I was recently told this (being a slow learner of the bleeding obvious) and it changed my life, or at the very least allowed me to change my hoses.

    Bill
    Akoya (the South Sea Pearl - ex Sealivin)
    Independence 31 Hull #71
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    Down Under, Port Stephens, Australia

  11. #11
    Principal Partner GrandpaSteve's Avatar
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    The heat gun is necessary. I should have listened, at first I didnít, but the heat gun saved me.
    1987 E32-III "Glory Days"
    Hull #711
    Slip in Rock Hall MD.
    Home in Downingtown PA.

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    Senior Moderator Loren Beach's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    Heat, in moderation, will help get the new hose on the barb. Use some lube, also. Jokes about KY aside, - and it is indeed a good product for this, you can use silicone sealant to encourage the new hose onto a fitting.. it's also really slippery stuff.

    Remove the old hose by cutting with a sharp knife blade -- you're just going to throw it away anyhow. Wear vinyl gloves, as well.
    "Been there, done that"
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  13. #13
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    Just adding a photo for others who need to remove/replace hoses in a E32-3. This is the bottom of the deck fitting to show the two clamps which must be removed before the deck fitting can be removed. I could not just remove the 4 screws on the deck and pull the hose up, as the hole is not large enough for the clamps to come through. Access is through the medicine cabinet front wall plus opening the vinyl headliner.

    Once the deck fitting was removed, the rubber gasket was found hardened, allowing water to leak past the fitting, run down the space shown in the photo, and then to the bilge.

    The small hose is a breather vent for the holding tank. The hose looks like it was clear soft vinyl 34 years ago but it was hardened black plastic when removed. It is just open to the space behind the rear wall of the medicine cabinet.

    Last edited by Tin Kicker; 02-11-2019 at 07:11 AM.

  14. #14
    Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm Sati's Avatar
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    Maybe dumb question here Tin Kicker, but where on the boat do you get access to those hoses/the deck fitting from underneath?
    Geoff W.
    s/v "Delightful"
    1987 E32-3
    Hull #712

  15. #15
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    Above the toilet, the forward wall of the medicine cabinet has to come out. It doesn't come easily. This photo is directly behind the 110V plug.

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