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woolamaloo

My anchor locker expansion.

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Like most people here, I’ve had to deal with the anchor pan leaking into my v-berth. Two winters ago, I removed the pan and scraped what I thought was all of the old silicone caulk from the joint and used LifeSeal to put it back in place. It was definitely better but sill leaked.

Last winter, I pulled the pan, and spent many hours scraping, wire brushing, and using several silicone removing solvents to remove – what I hoped – would be all the silicone. I then used butyl tape to rebed the anchor pan. It leaked way worse. Despite my effort, there were still a few small areas of silicone – which the butyl does not stick to. I removed the pan last summer and spend a weekend cleaning it back up and bedding it with polysulfide (Life-Calk). This was better but I still had drips into the v-berth.

Time for something more drastic.

I once again pulled the pan. My plan was to grind a layer of gelcoat/fiberglass off the mating surfaces and epoxy them back together. Of course, the problem with this is that it would remove my access to the forward cleats, stanchions, etc… Many of you have dealt with this same issue and that’s one of the things that makes this forum such a great resource. In this post, I was particularly struck by how Shelman handled it by glassing in new bulkheads but still using part of his anchor pan to clean up the rough edge left in the hull when the pan is removed. And, in this post, I was intrigued by Craig’s use of Coosa instead of plywood for his bulkheads.

I couldn’t find a piece of Coosa board smaller than a 4x8 sheet locally so I ended up buying it from Boat Outfitters and had it shipped to me. It’s surprisingly light and stiff. I cut my bulkheads easily with a jigsaw and applied two layers of glass and epoxy to seal and strengthen them. I doubt they needed that but I needed the epoxy practice. My plan was to leave the anchor pan that is over the v-berth intact and cut out the front of the pan to make the bigger locker and to maintain access to everything in the bow. There were a lot of requirements and angles for that bulkhead shape to make that work. It took me six rounds of cardboard patterns to get it close enough.

I had one additional issue that I’ll cover more in a later blog post. Another winter project was the installation of a composting head. Instead of venting the head through the deck, I decided to vent it into the anchor locker. The planning and execution of this was actually the hardest part of this project. But you’ll see the big hole in the pictures where I mounted the vent and fan shroud.

After cutting the front of the pan out, I also filled all the old screw holes with thickened epoxy. I used thickened epoxy to set the bulkheads in place and after sanding down the rough spots, used glass and epoxy on all the seams - twice. Then, I bedded the modified pan back into place with thickened epoxy and used a couple pieces of scrap wood to hold the sides straight while it cured. After that cured, I glassed over the cut edges of the pan where they contact the top of the new bulkhead to ensure there could be no water migration under that edge.

I had to do some grinding on the hatch to make it fit in spots where the epoxy was a little too thick to allow the hatch to close. The latch on the hatch had broken a year ago so I replaced that too. I painted everything with two coats of Bilgekote. Then, I installed the head vent and a cleat for the bitter end. I cut a piece of Dri-Dek for the bottom and I put my rode back in the new locker.

Overall, I’m fairly pleased with how it came out. I wouldn’t want anyone inspecting my epoxy work too closely. If I stay dry this summer, it will be worth it.

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Updated 04-15-2018 at 04:10 PM by woolamaloo

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Comments

  1. footrope's Avatar
    Another nice locker project. Well done. How will you drain the locker? To keep out rain and water over the bow, I was able to use a solid gasket (Lowe's "Marine" gasket) around the hatch edge that is working well for rain anyway. I have not painted my locker or added the Dri-Dek I bought. Spring project.

    Craig
  2. woolamaloo's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by footrope
    Another nice locker project. Well done. How will you drain the locker? To keep out rain and water over the bow, I was able to use a solid gasket (Lowe's "Marine" gasket) around the hatch edge that is working well for rain anyway. I have not painted my locker or added the Dri-Dek I bought. Spring project.

    Craig
    Craig,

    The old pan had a drain with a small hose that went to a copper tube that drains through the bow. It's hard to see but you can kind of see it in the second picture. I made that copper tube the bottom of the new locker. It should drain great.

    Jim
  3. kiwisailor's Avatar
    Another great project write up!
  4. footrope's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by woolamaloo
    Craig,

    The old pan had a drain with a small hose that went to a copper tube that drains through the bow. It's hard to see but you can kind of see it in the second picture. I made that copper tube the bottom of the new locker. It should drain great.

    Jim
    Thanks for the clarification, Jim. My copper tube is about 7 inches above my new floor. I haven't plugged it.
  5. mjsouleman's Avatar
    Do you mean
    https://www.lowes.com/pd/M-D-10-ft-B...rstrip/1038917
    M-D 10-ft Black Rubber Marine Automotive Weatherstrip

  6. footrope's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by mjsouleman
    Do you mean
    https://www.lowes.com/pd/M-D-10-ft-B...rstrip/1038917
    M-D 10-ft Black Rubber Marine Automotive Weatherstrip
    Yes, that is the weatherstrip I used. It is flexible, quite strong, and is a dense closed cell neoprene-type foam.
  7. bigd14's Avatar
    Nice work! I did almost the exact same job, except with epoxy coated plywood, and ran the locker a little deeper, with another hole a bit lower for a drain. Also I did not re-use the anchor locker, so I still have a passage at the top of the anchor locker between the deck and the shelf where water could get back into the v berth if the locker filled up. I am trying to figure out how I would go about sealing them off in case the anchor locker fills with water due to clogged drain holes.
    Updated 05-02-2018 at 10:21 PM by bigd14
  8. woolamaloo's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by bigd14
    Nice work! I did almost the exact same job, except with epoxy coated plywood, and ran the locker a little deeper, with another hole a bit lower for a drain. Also I did not re-use the anchor locker, so I still have a passage at the top of the anchor locker between the deck and the shelf where water could get back into the v berth if the locker filled up. I am trying to figure out how I would go about sealing them off in case the anchor locker fills with water due to clogged drain holes.
    I really couldn't have gone much lower without a lot more work. There was a small bulkhead already in place that I would have had to cut out. I'm probably about 1-2 inches above that. You can see it in the first picture with the hole in it a little to port. I considered making that the bottom of the new locker by just glassing over it but then I'd need another drain hole in the bow. It didn't seem worth it for the 1-2 inches.

    Mine is sealed and glassed to within an inch of the deck. I suppose that it's possible that the new locker could fill with water and overflow into the v-berth. But I suspect that if it were full to that level, I'd notice the bow being way too heavy. I made a rough calculation that it could hold about 150 gallons before it overflowed. That much water would weigh about 1,200 pounds. I hope I'd notice that much weight on the bow before it ran into the v-berth.

    Check out what Shelman did in this post. You could probably glass back from the top of your new bulkhead at an angle to the back of the hatch opening.

    How do you keep water running into your v-berth in the back half of the hatch opening? That was my main reason for doing this project in the first place.


    Jim
    Woolamaloo
    Cleveland, Ohio
    1985 E30+ #685/Universal M18
  9. bigd14's Avatar
    To cover the v berth I just ran a piece of plywood along the top of the new sloping bulkhead and the existing half height bulkhead at the forward end of the v berth and glassed it all together. I did not reuse any of the anchor locker which is why there is now a gap just under the deck. Maybe I’ll try expanding foam.

    Updated 05-14-2018 at 04:43 PM by bigd14