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kiwisailor

Repair Saturated Anchor Locker Lid

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When it’s only 10f outside working on the boat is no fun. So time to bring the saturated anchor lid home and repair it in the garage in a barmy 40f.

The lid was identified in the survey last year as saturated and if just got to it on my to do list. Want to see what a saturated balsa cored lid looks like see below. I’m interested in any pointers from other members who have had to do the same repair.

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  1. Christian Williams's Avatar
    This would get (much) more attention as a post in the Maintenance and Mechanical Forum here, since it is a request for information rather than a completed project.

    The lid does look a mess, and I suppose I would proceed with new balsa and glass in the manner of a deck-core repair. (There are several good threads on that available by Google search). I fixed some bad delamination by saturation with with epoxy, but this does seem a bit far gone for that. Good luck, sounds like a worthy project.
  2. Neil Gallagher's Avatar
    I just finished this project on my '84 e381 although mine was not as wet. I replaced about the aft 10" of lid with new wood and West Systems epoxy with Collodial Sicilia. I used my table saw and sliced a pine 2x2 to create the end grain wood, then epoxied it into the lid. I finished it off with 3 layers of epoxy and cloth then painted the entire bottom of the lid. It's installed on the boat and is no longer soft to step on. Hooray! Sorry I did'nt take pictures of the project.
  3. Kenneth K's Avatar
    I had mine repaired last year. The culprit on my lid was the anchor chain wearing through the fiberglass "hawse hole".

    Be aware that once you cut out the wood core, the fiberglass shell loses the curvature that was built into it. When you go to re-glass, either 1) keep checking the fit against the anchor locker lip--before you "stiffen" up the coring or FG, or 2) leave sufficient flex in the finished product so you can still flex it into place enough to close the anchor locker latch.

    My repair went well enough. The resulting curvature of the lid is now slightly greater than it was originally. This works well; when I kneel on the lid, the center flattens slightly, pushing the starboard edge outward slightly which allows me to latch it shut (the port edge is fixed in place by the hinges). It then holds tightly under latch. If the final curvature had been "flatter" than original, I don't know how one would "bend" the (center of the the) lid upward if such were required to get it to latch.
  4. Pat C.'s Avatar
    I had to do this a number of years ago. Used a plunge router to clean out the old balsa and glass from the shell, very messy but very effective. I did have a smoother surface to work with than yours appears to be though. Trace the camber of the deck on a 1X4, place it along the aft edge of the deck at the hatch opening when the hatch is removed. Then cut along the tracing on the 1x4 with a band saw or jig saw...make about a dozen of those, assemble them a cradle to lie the hatch shell in upside down. End grain balsa, flood with epoxy, roll on some fiberglass mat. Cover with waxed paper, lie some weight on top to force the hatch to follow the camber ( I used a couple of barbell weights) and let dry. Remove weights next day when dry and hardened (probably ready sooner but why rush), paint for UV protection (minimal exposure but peace of mind), then reinstall. Did mine every bit of a decade ago if not more, no problems since. Keep the balsa away from the edges to allow an epoxy frame. The original had balsa all the way to the edges which allowed water intrusion requiring the repair. Good Luck!
  5. kiwisailor's Avatar
    Thank you everyone for the good pointers. Once it warms up above freezing here I’ll start tackling this project. I’m leaning back towards using balsa core to get provide the curved shape I’ll need.
  6. JSM's Avatar
    Did this same job on my 34-2 last year. All of the coring was wet. Where ever any hardware penetrated the lid water followed. To remove the old coring and glass I used a vibrating (Harbor Freight) multi tool . Once the old coring was out new coring was glued in using thickened epoxy. Be sure the cut the new coring back around all penetrations so that hardware will go thru solid epoxy. Last step is to glass over the new coring.
    I found that the outer "shell" of the lid retained its shape after removing the old coring and everything went back together fairly easily.
    This project was much easier than anticipated and the new lid is rock solid.
  7. kiwisailor's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by JSM
    Did this same job on my 34-2 last year. All of the coring was wet. Where ever any hardware penetrated the lid water followed. To remove the old coring and glass I used a vibrating (Harbor Freight) multi tool . Once the old coring was out new coring was glued in using thickened epoxy. Be sure the cut the new coring back around all penetrations so that hardware will go thru solid epoxy. Last step is to glass over the new coring.
    I found that the outer "shell" of the lid retained its shape after removing the old coring and everything went back together fairly easily.
    This project was much easier than anticipated and the new lid is rock solid.
    Great feedback on this project. I feel confident in doing the job and my lid has also retained it's slight curve shape.

    The question I have is how many layers of glass cloth and type to apply to the underside to seal it all up?