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Forepeak Hull Ceilings Completed

Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average.
Recently we did the final part of the project to install new insulated hull ceilings in the forepeak. As noted here previously, we used honeycomb panels from from the former Boeing Surplus Store in Seattle. Same Formica surface treatment.
Since the uppers had to fit under the sides of the anchor locker, this was the time to pull off the factory vinyl "head liner" material under it. It had always had some old mold and water damage in one corner from a small deck leak ignored by the prior owner. (I repaired that little leak over 20 years ago, but restored the staples on the starboard side where I accessed the underside of the deck.

It's interesting to "deconstruct" the finishing procedure that EY used.
AFAIK they first stapled up the front with a small wood batten over the material. Then they stapled their way down each side. Given that this could only be done before they glassed in the rear trim panel, they did the sides with the thin battens and stretched the vinyl tight. Finally they tabbed in the top of the teak plywood panel that you see looking forward towards the bow. That panel was screwed in to now-hidden cleats on each side as well.
Then they wrapped up the vinyl on the outside bottom where it would be covered by the bottom teak trim.
That panel was trimmed out by solid teak pieces all around its face/perimeter.

My last challenge now is to reinstall those trims, after re-sawing the angles on all corners to reflect the narrowed-up area to be trimmed out.

For a new "overhead" piece where that vinyl used to live, I went with a flat fitted piece of matching Formica. It is backed with one layer of 4 oz glass all over, and all four sides have a two inch piece of of cloth tape epoxied on as well. To keep it from sagging I glassed on a piece of honeycomb across, about an inch wide, as a 'rib'.
The front and both sides are held up by new teak trims, and the rear has several #6 screws driven up into the edge of the teak face panel. The screws show slightly now, even tho recessed, but should be out of sight once the rear trim is reinstalled, down-set about 1/8" .
It is very light weight, and that area can now be accessing in the future by simply removing some screws.

I should note that if the PO had cared for the original fabric hull ceilings, there would be little need for this upgrade.

The upgrade to the area looks good IMHO. But then I would say that.
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Updated 07-12-2017 at 08:15 AM by Loren Beach

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  1. footrope's Avatar
    Very nice work. Do you have a picture of the honeycomb material? How did you come to choose formica? I just took down that curved-top bulkhead from behind the anchor locker pan during my locker project. Not sure it's worth saving after some years of water damage, but it is thicker than I expected. Thanks for posting the details of your project.
  2. Loren Beach's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by footrope
    Very nice work. Do you have a picture of the honeycomb material? How did you come to choose formica? I just took down that curved-top bulkhead from behind the anchor locker pan during my locker project. Not sure it's worth saving after some years of water damage, but it is thicker than I expected. Thanks for posting the details of your project.
    See the blog entry for 6-6-16, for a photo of the material.
    The formica is a color and texture match for the factory countertops and later all of the subsequent hull ceiling finishes I did elsewhere in our boat. Not the only 'right answer' but it's one we like. (This appearance stuff is all pretty subjective, anyway...)