Blog Comments

  1. sgwright67's Avatar
    Thanks for posting! Although we haven't yet purchased the boat, it's likely this will be one of the jobs I will need to do. The new rails look great.
  2. kapnkd's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by SeaDart
    THANKS!!! I've been looking at their teak and holly for the cabin sole too. What about the install? Any difficulties?
    Merry Christmas Sea Dart!

    Not really, biggest thing is patience in planning your cuts, using a long straight edge and good sharp blade for precise cuts.

    I bought a roll of carpet floor paper 24" wide at Lowe's and made patterns for each area. I then copied the patterns to the bottom to keep the pencil lines off the teak and holly side. The paper was also a help in keeping the holly lines matched up from section to section for a consistent and aesthetic look.

    They have two types of adhesives for depending on what type of sole you have. Their reps are very knowledgeable and helpful. Also, check out their website and YouTube for independent how to videos.

    I've got photos that were posted in the past or can send you if you reply to my email at kkdiehl0427@sbcglobal.net (can't post them here).

    Like the handrails, the PlasTeak holds up well, cleans easily and takes a beating well.

    Fair Winds!
    -kerry
  3. SeaDart's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by kapnkd
    Very nice job and the split design does look really good! We too went with the PlasTeak rails on our Ď32 but were close enough to the factory to pick them up and save on the shipping. We even got a tour! Impressive operation and they have lots of other great products too! (Used their interior Teak & Holly for our cabin sole.)

    3 seasons now, they still look like new and havenít needed any maintenance. We oversized the holes then filled them solid with resin and redrilled the holes so if they ever leak it will no longer leach into the balsa coring. We bedded the rails with white butyl tape (purchased at an RV place) The butyl never dries so remains flexible and was much easier to clean up plus was a consistent thickness when bedding the rails.

    Also, we drilled completely through the inside cabin top liner and pulled the hand rails down with inside trim nuts to compress the rails more tightly to the cabin top. So far - no leaks, no drips, no errors!
    THANKS!!! I've been looking at their teak and holly for the cabin sole too. What about the install? Any difficulties?
  4. kapnkd's Avatar
    Very nice job and the split design does look really good! We too went with the PlasTeak rails on our ‘32 but were close enough to the factory to pick them up and save on the shipping. We even got a tour! Impressive operation and they have lots of other great products too! (Used their interior Teak & Holly for our cabin sole.)

    3 seasons now, they still look like new and haven’t needed any maintenance. We oversized the holes then filled them solid with resin and redrilled the holes so if they ever leak it will no longer leach into the balsa coring. We bedded the rails with white butyl tape (purchased at an RV place) The butyl never dries so remains flexible and was much easier to clean up plus was a consistent thickness when bedding the rails.

    Also, we drilled completely through the inside cabin top liner and pulled the hand rails down with inside trim nuts to compress the rails more tightly to the cabin top. So far - no leaks, no drips, no errors!
    Updated 12-15-2018 at 01:30 PM by kapnkd
  5. jnevins's Avatar
    Thank you Christian... !!! I have been living with a horrific leak through the rudder post for many years on my 1973 Ericson 32 #278. When motoring with my Atomic 4, the bilge would completely fill up once each hour while underway... how many gallons could that be? That amount of water is 120 pumps on my Whale Gusher bilge pump. I laughed out loud in your description of the inventor of this fitting.

    Well done!

    Jerry
    "Solstice"
    Noank, CT
  6. Sati's Avatar
    So did you paint the epoxy around the whole veneer surrounding the portlight? In my head you're just sealing the interior edge which gets covered by the portlight anyways.

    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Williams
    Basic "painting" for both in this sort of thing. The CPES is very thin, and gets absorbed. The epoxy to seals everything and just gets flowed on. It makes a surface like varnish, but without any UV protection or scuff resistance. So it has to be coated with paint or varnish and can't be left as the final treatment.

    I only treated the veneer that was damaged--the rest of it was sound and unlikely to get wet. The epoxied areas were clamped flat to cure behind boards lined with plastic sheeting. You can see them in the panoramic photo. That was necessary because some veneer at the portlight edges was damaged and loose.

    By the way, if you use interior curtains, consider that they may well hide much of this work, which is essentially cosmetic anyhow. Making the port installations waterproof is the important goal, and what the job is all about.
  7. Christian Williams's Avatar
    Basic "painting" for both in this sort of thing. The CPES is very thin, and gets absorbed. The epoxy to seals everything and just gets flowed on. It makes a surface like varnish, but without any UV protection or scuff resistance. So it has to be coated with paint or varnish and can't be left as the final treatment.

    I only treated the veneer that was damaged--the rest of it was sound and unlikely to get wet. The epoxied areas were clamped flat to cure behind boards lined with plastic sheeting. You can see them in the panoramic photo. That was necessary because some veneer at the portlight edges was damaged and loose.

    By the way, if you use interior curtains, consider that they may well hide much of this work, which is essentially cosmetic anyhow. Making the port installations waterproof is the important goal, and what the job is all about.
    Updated 12-10-2018 at 06:42 PM by Christian Williams
  8. Sati's Avatar
    Hey Christian - newbie question here, but can you say more about the actual process you used to apply/inject the CPES as well as the West System? Do you literally inject the CPES with a syringe? And how do you spread the epoxy around?
  9. SeaDart's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth K
    Hey, that looks really nice. Interesting that the 2+3 loops look better than the original long rail.

    Only problem I see with the PlasTeak is that your gonna mis the annual tape/scrape/varnish routine you would have had with wood.

    I know. The lack of maintenance is something I'll have to struggle with. But I think I'll be okay. Thanks!
  10. Kenneth K's Avatar
    Hey, that looks really nice. Interesting that the 2+3 loops look better than the original long rail.

    Only problem I see with the PlasTeak is that your gonna mis the annual tape/scrape/varnish routine you would have had with wood.
  11. Slick470's Avatar
    Huh, the light air spin sheets that came with our boat have those connectors on them. I didn't realize how light of a load rating they have. Being plastic, I'm not surprised. I also learned that they are exactly the shape and size of the spin pole jaw and it would get really jammed in there if I wasn't careful. So, I added some of those donut things, which of course adds weight and probably nils any weight savings I get by using the plastic clips...
  12. bgary's Avatar
    This is awesome! I've been looking for a set of nabshackles for a long time (light-air spinnaker sheets). Thanks for the link!
  13. Loren Beach's Avatar
    They came with the boat, altho we are sure that the PO never used them. They are a heavy duty version of Phiffertex, with stitched hems and grommets.
  14. mjsouleman's Avatar
    Hi Loren, I like the lee cloth, is that a DIY project?

    MJS
  15. mfield's Avatar
    A heartwarming story for the Thanksgiving season - I hope you have many fun years with Tween'r.
  16. Loren Beach's Avatar
    Perhaps poor practice to respond to my own blog, but I just noticed Christian's excellent thread entry on this subject and wanted to link up the subject matter.
    http://www.ericsonyachts.org/infoexc...&referrerid=28
  17. Tarrymore's Avatar
    I thought that rail guard in your videos looked different than the stock rounded design! Love this thread, thanks!

    - Dale
  18. Tarrymore's Avatar
    Now that's a wrap!
  19. toddster's Avatar
    Maybe... I've been contemplating retirement and extended low-budget cruising. The hypothetical use-case is Alaska to Baja. It's a little hard to make a big life decision, but meanwhile I'm doing some "prepping" when the opportunity presents itself. I've accumulated quite a collection of gear that represents other peoples cast-off and recycled dreams. Considering that it may be several years (if ever?) before the boat is back at the workshop again, I'm trying to do as much of the work I'd conceivably ever want to do that requires bottom-out and mast-down access. (Subject to reasonable budget, that is...) E.g. I don't really need the wind vane or the scuba compressor mounted all the time in the local marina, but I'd like to have the hardware and reinforcements in place so that I could simply bolt them on when they're needed.

    (Last winter, the wind vane was disassembled, de-salted, repaired, and painted. Now it's time to get it off the workbench.)
  20. Christian Williams's Avatar
    Just catching up and--say, what's going on here? Steps on the mast, wind vane on the stern?

    Something you're not telling us about cruising plans?

    And by the way, as you already know, many folks wrap the rudder with something reflective, as apparently they don't do well in the sun when drying out.
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